Congressional – Executive Commission on China December 2020 Report

Congressional – Executive Commission on China December 2020 Report
https://www.cecc.gov/sites/chinacommission.house.gov/files/2020%20ANNUAL%20REPORT%20FINAL%201223_0.pdf

From the Executive Summary:
The Congressional-Executive Commission on China (Commission) was established by the U.S.-China Relations Act of 2000 (Public Law No. 106–286) as the People’s Republic of China (PRC) prepared to enter the World Trade Organization.

The Commission is mandated by law to issue an annual report to the President and the Congress focusing on whether the acts of the PRC are in compliance with or in violation of internationally recognized human rights, including the rights to free expression, peaceful assembly, and religious belief and practice, as well as any progress or regression on the development of the rule of law. The Commission is also mandated to maintain a database of political prisoners in China—individuals who have been detained or imprisoned for exercising their internationally recognized civil and political rights, as well as rights protected by China’s Constitution and other domestic laws.

The Commission’s 2020 Annual Report covers the period from July 1, 2019 to July 1, 2020. As discussed in the subsequent chapters of this report, the Chinese government and Communist Party have taken unprecedented steps in the last year to extend their repressive policies through censorship, intimidation, and the detention of individuals and groups for exercising their fundamental human rights, especially in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR) and Hong Kong.

In recent years, the Commission has become increasingly concerned that the Chinese government and Party have expanded their human rights violations around the world, even reaching the American people. These efforts include threatening and intimidating critics, blocking social media content, pressuring publishers to censor their content in China, influencing academic institutions to the detriment of academic freedom, interfering in multilateral institutions, and pressuring U.S. and international companies to suppress practices that do not conform to the political narratives and demands of Chinese officials.


On Eastern Turkistan:
Over the last year, the Congressional-Executive Commission on China (Commission) found that the Chinese government and Communist Party have taken unprecedented steps to extend their repressive policies through censorship, intimidation, and the detention of people in China for exercising their fundamental human rights. Nowhere is this more evident than in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR) where new evidence emerged that crimes against humanity—and possibly genocide—are occurring, and in Hong Kong, where the ‘‘one country, two systems’’ frame-work has been effectively dismantled.

On Southern Mongolia:
In December 2019, authorities in Tongliao municipality, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, reportedly demolished a Buddhist temple on the grounds that it had been “illegally constructed.” Hundreds of herders knelt in front of the temple to protest its demolition, but police sprayed them with pepper spray and dispersed the crowd. Germany-based rights advocate Xi Haiming said that officials demolished the temple in order to eliminate the influence of religion and that they may have been concerned about the Tibetan Buddhist temple’s connection to the Dalai Lama. Many Mongols practice a form of Tibetan Buddhism.

On Tibet:
The Party and government continued to use legal and policy measures to manage and shape the religious practices of Tibetans. Tibetan Buddhism is one of five state-recognized religions, and falls under the formal jurisdiction of the state-controlled Buddhist Association of China, which this year issued two revised measures governing the credentialing of Tibetan Buddhist religious personnel and the hiring of monastic leaders at Tibetan Buddhist religious institutions.

Officials in Tibetan areas of China continued to enforce restrictions on religious observance and expressions of faith, including by prohibiting individuals from participating in religious events or celebrating holidays. Authorities in Sichuan province continued to carry out evictions of monks and nuns and demolition of monastic residences at the Yachen Gar Tibetan Buddhist complex.

The Chinese government and Communist Party continued to assert control over the processes of selection and recognition of Tibetan Buddhist reincarnated teachers, including the Dalai Lama. The Dalai Lama and Tibetan Buddhist leaders outside China maintained that the decision to reincarnate, or not, belongs to the individual in question and members of the Tibetan Buddhist religious community.

Congressional – Executive Commission on China December 2020 Report
https://www.cecc.gov/sites/chinacommission.house.gov/files/2020%20ANNUAL%20REPORT%20FINAL%201223_0.pdf

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